An important issue to consider in your welcome factor is the overall sound. The sound is another area that no one thinks about until it isn’t right. Then everyone gets distracted.This is what I know…

  • If the sound is too loud, it’s distracting… and you’ll have people (especially older people) looking for ear plugs.
  • If it’s too quiet, it will be unintelligible. No one will understand what’s going on. It’s just as distracting as if it was too loud. And people with hearing difficulties won’t be able to understand what is being said or sung.
  • With the worship team, if the ones singing harmony are as loud as the lead vocal (or worse, louder) no one know will know what the main melody line is… and they probably won’t sing. Harmony singers and the band are there to compliment the main vocal.

When it comes to mixing a worship team you need to remember that less is more. Rather than trying to make sure that every instrument and voice is clearly heard (this just won’t happen!), focus on the main voice and the main instrument for a given song. Blend everything else around these two.

Every voice and instrument has a specific frequency range that contributes to the overall sound. When more than one are in the same range, the sound will be “muddy.” This means that guitar needs to play something different than the keys, which will be different than the sax, etc.

For the message (sermon), it’s important for the voice to be loud and clear enough to be clearly heard but yet not overpowering.

And do yourself a favor, change the batteries in the wireless mic before the service… no one wants to waste money, but you can reuse the used batteries in some other device that won’t make a difference in the service.

The goal for the audio team is to reduce distractions by making the sound as crisp and pleasant to the audience as possible.  When the sound is mixed too “bright” (high frequencies are too loud) or harsh (upper midrange frequencies are too loud) people with sensitive hearing will experience discomfort or pain.

 

There are plenty of free online training resources to help those serving on the audio team.